Carworx Ltd - Paint work for your vehicle

No matter what your vehicle is made of, there is a top layer of paint to protect the body from the elements.  Automotive paints have a tough job protecting your car's body panels from the sun, dirt, rain and snow.

The suns UV rays are your paints worst enemy.Park in the shade whenever possible and always keep a good coat of wax on your car.The wax should have UV protection just like the sunscreen you use at the beach.

Different layers of paint The first layer applied to the metal panel of a vehicle is primer. Primer is designed to make the panel uniform so as to allow the paint colour to be evenly applied to it. Primer on modern cars is thinner than it used to be owing to advances in panel stamping technology, meaning the panels are being supplied in better, more even condition. As a result primer thickness these days, whilst varying according to car marque and individual plant operating processes, is usually between 8 microns (µm) and 38 microns (µm).

The second layer is the base colour coat, a semi-gloss layer that actually gives the panel its final colour. Again, as panels these days are of a more consistent quality, this layer is much thinner than it used to be. If the colour requires a flake or pearlescance to it, this is usually mixed in at this level. The thickness of this layer ranges from 13 microns (µm) to 38 microns (µm).

The final layer is the clear coat, an optically clear layer of lacquer designed to protect the base colour from UV degradation and oxidation. The thickness of this layer ranges from 38 microns (µm) to 102 microns (µm).

Preventive Maintenance: Wash the underside of your car during and after the rainy season. Folks in the coast areas have to do this more often , cause of the salt content in the areas.

Paintwork defects such as scratches, swirls and holograms are all removable by machine polishing. Machine polishing is a recognised method of paint correction for professionals and a growing number of amateur enthusiasts are also taking up the handle.

But how much is commonly known about the process behind paint correction and the science behind paint application technology?

The thickness of the paint you see on your car is measured in microns (µm), 1 micron is equivalent to one thousandth of a millimetre (1/1000mm). It’s comprised of three layers: Primer, Base Colour Coat and Clear Coat (lacquer). The most common paintwork imperfections occur as swirl marks, deep marring and scratches (usually introduced during the wash process), etching caused by acid rain and calcium carbonate deposits from environmental and industrial fallout, as well as buffer marks resulting from poor machine polishing techniques! These can best be seen using high output specialist lighting equipment such as the 3M Sun Gun, placed close to the paintwork surface.Prior to tackling any blemishes, it is vital to take multiple readings of the paint thickness using a Paint Depth Gauge.

This allows you to determine the combined thickness of primer, paint and clear coat and, using a rough guide as to the general thicknesses of these individual layers you will be able to ascertain how much clear coat is available to make the correction. However, it should be noted that paintwork has a degree of elasticity, allowing it to swell or shrink according to the environmental temperature being experienced by the vehicle. Therefore it is important to take depth measurements, both when the panels are cold and when they are hot. You may find the thickness varies by 2 microns (µm) or more!

The first layer applied to the metal panel of a vehicle is primer.Primer is designed to make the panel uniform so as to allow the paint colour to be evenly applied to it. Primer on modern cars is thinner than it used to be owing to advances in panel stamping technology, meaning the panels are being supplied in better, more even condition. As a result primer thickness these days, whilst varying according to car marque and individual plant operating processes, is usually between 8 microns (µm) and 38 microns (µm).

The second layer is the base colour coat, a semi-gloss layer that actually gives the panel its final colour. Again, as panels these days are of a more consistent quality, this layer is much thinner than it used to be. If the colour requires a flake or pearlescance to it, this is usually mixed in at this level. The thickness of this layer ranges from 13 microns (µm) to 38 microns (µm).

The final layer is the clear coat, an optically clear layer of lacquer designed to protect the base colour from UV degradation and oxidation. The thickness of this layer ranges from 38 microns (µm) to 102 microns (µm).

Ultimately this tells us the total thickness of the various layers on most modern cars is between 67 microns (µm) and 198 microns (µm). If you come across a panel or panels where the total depth is greater than 198 microns (µm), it is a strong indication the vehicle has been resprayed.

Its very easy to get an estimate for your vehicle, but remember cost varies on size of your vehicle, the actual paint type, damage on the body and paint damage thats there, quality of paint as well and finishing materials.